Vicki Alger Archive

Vicki Alger is a Research Fellow at the Independent Institute and Senior Fellow and Director of the Women for School Choice Project at the Independent Women’s Forum.
Full Biography and Recent Publications

Students Won’t Be Collateral Damage in California Big Spenders’ Showdown



There’s a showdown brewing in California’s not-so-OK Corral—make that the UC Corral—and students are fed up with being the ones caught in the crossfire. It started back in 2012 when Gov. Jerry Brown threatened to slash state funding for California’s 10 University of California campuses unless his Proposition 30  (also known as the “Millionaire’s Tax”)...
Read More »

NYC’s Success Academy Charter Schools Are Beating the Odds . . . and Powerful Unions



It’s no secret that labor union rules impose significant burdens on schools. More than a decade ago Lance Izumi oversaw a rigorous study that examined the impact of 25 years of collective bargaining on the effectiveness of California public schools. It found that rigid union rules put California schools and classrooms in a stranglehold...
Read More »

Obama’s Undisciplined School Discipline Reforms



Keeping kids safe at school should go hand in hand with ensuring high-quality academics. The U.S. Department of Education’s record on both fronts has been poor at best. During the No Child Left Behind era of George W. Bush, parents were supposed to have an Unsafe School Choice Option. Partisan politics and perverse incentives...
Read More »

Distorted Education Attack Ads Hide the Facts



Political campaigns across the country are heating up—thanks in no small part to all the hot air surrounding accusations about alleged “cuts” to education funding. As I explain in a recent USA Today column: In North Carolina, Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan has been savaging her opponent, Republican N.C. House Speaker Thom Tillis, for allegedly cutting $500 million from...
Read More »

Georgia’s Ivory Tower Behavior Modification-istas



This month a campus-wide smoking ban is supposed to take effect at the University of Georgia. Students objected that the ban was not passed with adequate student or faculty input and planned to protest with a “smoke-in.” Reasonable people can agree that smoking is not healthy—but forcing smokers to quit is a “cure” that’s...
Read More »

Coming Soon to California: Teachers’ Right to Work?



Big changes could be in the works for the California Teachers Association (CTA), the state affiliate of the country’s largest teachers union, the National Education Association (NEA). The CTA claims it has 325,000 members. How many of them are voluntary dues-paying members is anybody’s guess. In the past the CTA has demolished “paycheck protection”...
Read More »

Common Core Called the “Obamacare of Education”



US Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) makes a compelling case for abolishing Common Core in a recent letter. As Newsmax reports: “As a U.S. Senator, I’ve seen the federal government make a mess of everything it touches,” the Utah Republican wrote in the email sent out Monday morning. “And if they’re allowed to stay, Common...
Read More »

Gaming Gainful Employment



It looks like the U.S. Department of Education is fudging the numbers...again. The Obama administration is taking another run at imposing onerous gainful-employment regulations on private, for-profit career colleges. Under the new proposed regulations unveiled earlier this year, for students to qualify for federal aid for-profit career colleges must prove the estimated annual loan...
Read More »

Obama’s Latest Hostile Takeover Target: Private Career Colleges



The Obama administration’s latest college crusade claims it will help students. In reality, it’s a hostile takeover attempt by government of the private for-profit career college sector that will hurt students, taxpayers, and the economy. Education Secretary Arne Duncan acknowledges that the “majority of career colleges play a vital role in training our workforce...
Read More »

Oklahoma: Losing Federal Waiver, Winning Back Rightful Control over Education



By this school year all American students were supposed to be proficient in reading and math according to the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), the latest iteration of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). By 2011 it was clear that no state was even close, so the US Department of...
Read More »