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Vicki Alger Archive

Vicki Alger is a Research Fellow at the Independent Institute and Senior Fellow and Director of the Women for School Choice Project at the Independent Women’s Forum.
Full Biography and Recent Publications

U.S. Department Flunks Data Security ... Again



Earlier this week the full House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform blasted the U.S. Department of Education for its lax security surrounding student data. But this isn’t the first time ED’s been taken to the woodshed. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported in 2011 that ED still hadn’t implemented security controls recommend in...
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K-12 Course Choice: The Next Evolution in School Choice?



A fundamental tenet of parental choice in education is that students’ learning opportunities should be personalized rather than limited based on where their parents can afford to live. Online (or virtual) learning takes this concept even further by removing both geographical and temporal constraints. This month The Evergreen Education Group released its 11th annual...
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We Need to End, Not Mend, the ESEA



Today a House and Senate conference committee met to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), which was last reauthorized in 2002 as the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). There are numerous problems with the proposed compromise being considered (see here, here and here, for example). But the bigger question we should be asking...
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Honoring Veterans with Parental Choice in Education



Today we say ‘thank you for your service’ to our veterans willing to sacrifice their lives for our liberties. But we need to back up our words with actions. As the National Military Family Association notes: In today’s all-volunteer force, more than half have families, and as they transition out of the military, these...
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No More Common Core in Arizona



Arizona Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas made national headlines last year for standing up for parental rights in education and opposing Washington, DC-driven Common Core standards. This morning, Superintendent Douglas motioned the state education board, the entity responsible for adopting Common Core in Arizona back in 2010, to vote on the standards, which...
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Children Are Not Creatures of the State: New Hampshire Edition



Politicians across the country like to claim that they’re all in favor of local control of education—until parents and their locally elected officials actually start trying to exercise it. The small New Hampshire town of Croydon is a case in point. Like many small towns in New Hampshire, Croydon does not have public schools...
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Happy Birthday, US Department of Education...Now Go Away



Next month marks the 36th anniversary of the establishment of the U.S. Department of Education. Proponents insisted that such a department would improve federal education spending efficiency as well as student achievement. Opponents countered that there is scant (if any) evidence that increasing federal control over education would achieve either. Turns out, they were...
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Clinton’s Pitching $350 Billion in “Free” College



Earlier this month we learned that the Class of 2015 posted the lowest SAT college entrance exam scores in more than 40 years. Yet Hillary Clinton says college is an entitlement—not an opportunity that’s earned. Clinton will host a community forum today on college affordability in Durham, New Hampshire. We’ll recall that last month...
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Some Constitution Day Reflections about Government’s Role in Education



Today is the 228th anniversary of the signing of our Constitution—not that you’d know it from most news headlines. The big story today is yesterday’s Republican presidential debate. The headline from Politico grabbed my attention for lamenting that education was a “no-show”: Education didn’t just take a backseat during [last] night’s GOP presidential debate—it...
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Lessons for Taxpayers from Record Low SAT Scores



Nearly 1.7 million high school students took the SAT college aptitude exam this year—a record high. But the good news appears to stop there. According to Bloomberg Business: Students in the high school class of 2015 turned in the lowest critical reading score on the SAT college entrance exam in more than 40 years,...
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