Tag: Afghanistan
9/11, Independent Institute and 20 Years of the “War on Terror”
Literally on 9/11/01 and throughout the 20 culture-destroying years since, the Independent Institute has stood hard and fast for the difficult but essential principles that undergird liberty, human dignity, and the rule of law. While many whom we had thought shared our devotion to liberty were doing things like removing the word “Peace” from...
Read More »
Three Movies that Explore Complexity of the War on Terror
America’s chaotic exit from Afghanistan put the world spotlight back on global terrorism. The poorly executed departure has inspired radical Islamic terrorist groups to launch new attacks on Western nations as well as Afghanis unaligned with the goals of global terrorists. Rather than a retreat from the War on Terror, however, Western nations appear...
Read More »
Afghanistan: Two Implications for National Defense
The United States did not have a Department of Defense until 1947. Prior to that time, the nation had a Department of War. The name change is somewhat ironic and Orwellian, in that since the name change the Department has done little to actually defend the nation’s borders but has fought war after war...
Read More »
Biden Military Betrays Misguided Priorities
Carlos Del Toro, Joe Biden’s choice for Secretary of the Navy, has four priorities but only one involves protecting the United States from foreign adversaries, the sole legitimate purpose of the U.S. military. The first priority in Del Toro’s “four C’s is China, followed by culture, climate and covid. Del Toro, a failed candidate...
Read More »
The Sunk Cost Fallacy in the War on Terror
“Do you want their deaths to mean nothing?!” I’ve heard this argument a lot when discussing ending the perpetual war on terror. In fact, I was asked this precise question while on a recent panel discussing the merits of waging war on “radical Islam.” The idea behind this argument is easy enough to understand....
Read More »
Remember When the CIA Set Back Polio Eradication?
Recently I wrote about the origins of vaccine hesitancy among the African American population. While working on the piece, a friend and former colleague reminded me of another instance of the U.S. government thwarting vaccination efforts. This time it was polio. That may seem strange, given that the U.S. government desperately wanted a vaccine...
Read More »
U.S. Withdrawal Agreement from Afghanistan: Progress but Less than Meets the Eye
Watching news coverage of the U.S.-Taliban agreement would have the average person believing that an end to the longest war in American history was at hand and that U.S. troops would all be coming home from Afghanistan. And that is the impression that President Donald Trump, who promised to stop “endless wars” and is...
Read More »
DOD vs. CIA: Syria Edition
File this under the category of “I told you so.” In 2014, I wrote a piece on the idea of arming “moderate” Syrian rebels. The threat posed by the Islamic State, known also as ISIL or Deash, led many in Congress and President Obama to call for hundreds of millions of dollars to assist...
Read More »
Pay Attention to History
I recently had the chance to participate in an online seminar for high school debate team students. In preparing for their upcoming competition, they were interested in speaking with an economist about U.S. policy in the Middle East. An online lecture like this was a new experience for me—a very good one. First, I’m...
Read More »
The Military’s “Heroes” and the Scourge of Nationalism
At the airport, one observes an “interesting” composition of human behavior. A recent trip was no exception. Walking into the airport to checkin and check my bag, there was a clearly upset woman at one of the ticket kiosks. She barked at the woman behind the counter (who was assisting someone else) to come help...
Read More »
  • Catalyst
  • MyGovCost.org
  • FDAReview.org
  • OnPower.org
  • elindependent.org