Randall Holcombe Archive

Randall G. Holcombe is Research Fellow at The Independent Institute, DeVoe Moore Professor of Economics at Florida State University, past President of the Public Choice Society, and past President of the Society for the Development of Austrian Economics.
Full Biography and Recent Publications

Are Falling Prices a Bad Thing?



Popular opinion seems to be that falling prices—or even stable prices—are bad for the economy, but I’ve never seen any good arguments about why. I’ve just read another article about this, that gives six clearly numbered reasons, so let’s look at what the article says to see if they hold up.

Self Censorship



One by-product of the Paris terrorist attack on Charlie Hebdo was an outpouring of support for freedom of speech. While there was general agreement that the magazine’s content has been, beyond a doubt, offensive to some (and not only Muslims), almost everyone agreed that freedom of speech is a fundamental right that should be...
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One Benefit of Freedom of Speech and Freedom of the Press...



... is that you know who your enemies and opponents are. They will speak out against your ideas, your actions, or maybe just you on a personal level. One reason we value these freedoms is that they help make those in power accountable. Those who disagree with particular policies or actions can say so...
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Putin’s Collapsing Russia



Vladimir Putin, who worked for the Soviet Union’s KGB from the time he graduated from college through the Soviet Union’s dissolution, obviously is nostalgic for the days in which the Soviet Union was regarded as one of the world’s two superpowers, as it was when Putin joined the KGB in 1975. When Putin first...
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Normalizing Relations with Cuba: Good Policy



President Obama announced that the United States will restore full diplomatic relations with Cuba, which is a good move for both countries. The economic impact of the policy will be limited, however, because the economic embargo the United States has imposed on Cuba can be removed only by Congress. This presents the obvious political...
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Anti-Government Movements



The past five years have seen four major anti-government movements gain momentum. These movements have not been revolutionary movements, but rather movements that pushed to limit the scope of government in various ways. The Tea Party movement began in 2009 with the motivation of electing candidates to office who supported a reduction in the...
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The Ferguson Protesters vs. the Liberal Left



The protests that began in Ferguson against a government and a legal system that systematically work to oppress minorities and the disadvantaged have continued, now inflamed by the decision not to indict the New York police officer who killed Eric Gardner by placing him in a chokehold (because he was suspected of selling cigarettes)....
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Elizabeth Warren on the Economic Consequences of the Obama Administration



Elizabeth Warren, recently appointed to a Democratic leadership position in the Senate, explained her priorities: “Wall Street ... is doing very well, CEOs are bringing in millions more and families all across the country are struggling,” she said. “We have to make this government work for the American people. And that’s what I will...
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Saudi Arabia Pressures Russia



One remarkable aspect in the recent fall in global oil prices is that Saudi Arabia has not cut production to prop them up. Much of the speculation about why the Saudis have sat by passively and allowed the oil price decline has been that they are trying to undermine higher-cost producers in the US...
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Lesson from the Election: People Want Less Government



The lesson I draw from the Republican victories in the 2014 election is that people want less government. Since 2009 the number of Democratic Senators fell from 58 to 45, the number of democratic House members fell from 256 to 192, and the number of Democratic governors fell from 28 to 18. I’m not...
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