Tag: classical liberalism
Frederick Douglass: Lion of Individualist Liberalism

Blight, the Yale historian, is hardly unique in his misrepresentation of the classical liberal tradition.

The Core of the Classical Liberal Tradition: Adam Smith’s Concept of Justice

One of the best-known quotations from Adam Smith’s The Wealth of Nations (1776) defines natural liberty: “Every man, as long as he does not violate the laws of justice, is left perfectly free to pursue his own interest his own way, and to bring both his industry and capital into competition with those of...
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Pope Francis’s Failure to See Entrepreneurs as Good Samaritans Undercuts the Poor

On April 25, a videotaped talk by Pope Francis was released at the international TED conference in Vancouver, Canada. The 18-minute talk, titled “Why the Only Future Worth Building Includes Everyone,” can be viewed here. Francis highlighted three themes, beginning with the observation that community is central to human existence: [L]ife flows through our...
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What the Prague Spring Teaches Us Today about Liberty

Prague, Czech Republic is well recognized for its historical architecture and role as the cradle of civilization in Western Europe, but it’s role in reinventing itself as a peaceful, market-oriented democracy in the wake of Communism’s fall deserves to be a centerpiece of contemporary discussions about freedom and how easily it can be lost. For...
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Remembering Arthur Seldon, Champion of Capitalism

May 29 marks the centennial of Arthur Seldon’s 1916 birth. Called “one of the most influential economists of the late twentieth century,” for over three decades he was editorial director of the London-based Institute of Economic Affairs, which The Economist said, “brought to the lay reader the ideas of all the leading free-market economists...
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Anthony de Jasay: Political Philosopher Par Excellence

Anthony de Jasay isn’t a household name, but he should be. The former Parisian banker is one of the most original thinkers in political philosophy today, and his insights on the nature of liberty, justice, and the state have major implications for how we might improve our governments, communities, and culture. The Summer 2015...
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Why Frédéric Bastiat Still Matters

Yesterday marked the 214th anniversary of Frédéric Bastiat’s birthday on June 30, 1801, in Bayonne, France. One of the seminal thinkers of the classical liberal tradition, Bastiat made great contributions to the field of political economy, laying many of the foundations for the later school of Austrian economics. Both a politician and a writer,...
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Military Education Savings Accounts: A Great Way to Provide Educational Choice

This Memorial Day we remember and honor our fellow citizens who were willing to defend our American liberties to the death. Nobel Prize–winning economist Milton Friedman was a leading proponent of ending military conscription, or the draft, because forced military service is incompatible with a free society. Thanks in no small part to his...
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Another Urban Legend? The Middle Ages Were the “Dark Ages”

As the culture wars intensify in America, let’s consider some of the roots of these contentious conflicts. With the “Age of Enlightenment” of the 17th and 18th centuries, a “modern” narrative was invented to explain the history of the West, the wider world, and humankind’s place in the universe. This narrative claimed that liberty,...
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Authority and Easter

Easter is the day of liberation—the day the greatest earthly power has done its best, unleashed its ultimate weapon—and been defeated.

  • Catalyst
  • MyGovCost.org
  • FDAReview.org
  • OnPower.org
  • elindependent.org