Tag: civil rights
Jacob Blake, More Riots, and a Forced Narrative

We have all seen the short video of the conflict between police and Jacob Blake. The shooting has led to riots in Kenosha, Wisconsin, wanton destruction of property, and loss of life. The headlines and story from the mainstream media try to shoehorn the incident into the popular narrative of white supremacy and police...
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Leaked George Floyd Video: Shedding Light on the Arrest

After weeks of riots, calls to defund the police, and national acceptance of the systematic racism narrative spun buy radicals, the public can finally see the full story of George Floyd’s encounter with law enforcement. The leaked body-cam footage obtained by the Daily Mail shows a legitimate law enforcement investigation, a non-compliant suspect, and...
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George Floyd and the Future of Police Misconduct

The death of George Floyd at the hands of a police officer with a history of excessive force complaints has spurred protests, demonstrations, and riots across the nation. Peaceful protests are more than justified. However, the lawless riots are not; they are enacting the very injustices they claim to contest and on a colossal...
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My Country, Wrong and Right

On this Fourth of July, Americans are polarized even on the merits of the nation’s Independence.

Frederick Douglass: Lion of Individualist Liberalism

Blight, the Yale historian, is hardly unique in his misrepresentation of the classical liberal tradition.

Review: Marshall Spotlights Neglected Part of Civil Rights History

Marshall, the biopic of the illustrious and path-breaking civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall, is an important reminder about just how deep-seated racism and prejudice were in American society (and some say still are). Well acted and evenly paced, the film is a worthy addition to a growing list of good films depicting layered aspects...
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50 Years Ago Today: The Detroit Riot and the Decline of Civil Rights Liberalism (II)

Throughout American history, government at all levels has used race to categorize, enslave, segregate, regulate human behavior, and limit immigration with “nationality” quotas that served as substitutes for race. Categorizing by race was essential to racist agendas.

In response, classical liberal civil rights activists struggled to eliminate government-mandated racial categories. They were anything but naive: racism was real, categories or no categories, but the government stamp of approval made things worse–and caused constant mischief in the ever increasing addition of group categories in the census or in immigration statutes. The only feasible solution was the most radical one: the complete elimination of government racial categories. Individuals might discriminate but would no longer have the support of the State. With time, classical liberals felt, the irrationality of racism and xenophobia would give way to better human relations.

50 Years Ago Today: The Detroit Riot and the Decline of Civil Rights Liberalism (I)

Fifty years ago today (July 23, 1967), the largest urban riot of the 1960s rocked Detroit for five days (July 23-28). An encounter with the police (shutting down an illegal after-hours bar), sparked looting and arson on a scale far surpassing the riots that had burned in other American cities. While such riots often started with incidents involving law enforcement, the police were ordered—again and again—to stand down and let a small minority of African Americans loot property of small business owners (both black and white).

The Detroit Riot marked a turning point in how American policymakers dealt with race. The classical liberal tradition of civil rights, with its emphasis on rule of law and equal protection (regardless of race) gave way to policies that purposely treated minorities as “protected categories” deserving of treatment not accorded other citizens.

Say No to Reparations: Remembering Slavery, Forgetting the Classical-Liberal Values that Abolished It

Advocates of reparations for the descendants of African American slaves recently challenged socialist Bernie Sanders to embrace their cause, which he refused to do. A leading advocate of reparations, Atlantic contributor Ta-Nehisi Coates, criticizes Sanders for placing class-based politics before race. Lost in the unending debate over reparations is a key point: group reparations ignore the...
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Rosa Parks Day: The Triumph of Colorblindness and Capitalism

Sixty years ago, Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat for a white man and was arrested for disobeying Montgomery, Alabama’s segregation ordinance. The story is well-known, even today, as we celebrate “Rosa Parks Day” (December 1). Following her arrest, African Americans organized a boycott of the city’s privately-owned bus company. Martin Luther King, Jr. became spokesman for street protests and, ever since, the civil rights movement is remembered as a militant expression of civil disobedience and “taking it to the streets.” Within a year, the city ended desegregation, but not for the reasons you might think. The real heroes behind Rosa Parks were the NAACP lawyers who battered down the walls of institutional racism with the force of the constitution, color-blind law, and capitalist forces that worked against racism—hallmarks of the classic liberal tradition of civil rights.

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