Archive for May, 2013
Classical Liberalism’s Impossible Dream

I can understand why someone might embrace classical liberalism. I did so myself more than forty years ago. People become classical liberals for two main reasons, which are interrelated: first, because they come to understand that free markets “work” better than government-controlled economic systems in providing prosperity and domestic peace; second, because people come...
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Congressional Criticism of Apple’s Taxes

I was mildly amused, and somewhat amazed, at last week’s Congressional hearings on Apple Computer’s corporate tax avoidance. Here is an article from the New York Times critical of Apple. While Apple has sheltered substantial amounts of income from taxation via offshore corporations, all sides agree that Apple was in compliance with US and...
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Grocery Stores, Healthcare, and the Case for Real Markets

Think of a supermarket. There are probably more than a hundred in the city of Dallas alone. I can walk into any of them—in most cases, at any time day or night—and buy thousands of different products. The only wait I experience is at checkout, but express lanes speed that along if I want...
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Bush Wasn’t a Conservative and Obama Isn’t a Liberal

Americans need to stop picking the politicians they support based on how those politicians self-identify. Each of us needs to know what values we hold, and when all the evidence shows that the guy claiming to represent those values doesn’t, give up the party line. Conservatives are supposed to be for limited government—both in...
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Crony Capitalism?

The US Postal Service is selling hundreds of properties in prime locations across the country to help them deal with their financial difficulties. In the past, the USPS has used multiple real estate agents to sell their properties, but in 2011 the USPS signed a contract with CBRE Group to be the sole provider...
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The Folly of Medicare’s One-Ailment-per-Visit Rule

The problem in medicine is not merely that all the prices are wrong. A lot of very important things doctors can do for patients are not even on the list of tasks that Medicare compensates. In addition, Medicare has strict rules about how tasks can be combined. For example, special-needs patients typically have five...
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Recommended Reading: Challenge of Liberty Student Seminar

Recommended Reading: Challenge of Liberty Student Seminar Colorado Springs, June 17–21 2013 Below you will find the reading for the summer seminar. To fully understand each lecture, you will want to at least look at all the preparatory readings. The supplemental readings are less necessary. See especially the Plato, Cochran, and Higgs items. Monday:...
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Power Corrupts

At one time, President Obama noted similarities between his presidency and Ronald Reagan’s, but these days it seems his administration is more often compared with Nixon’s. The Benghazi coverup, followed by the IRS scandal that targeted right wing groups, followed by the revelation that the Department of Justice seized the telephone records of Associated...
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Six Billion Physician Fees

Even though prices don’t have the same meaning in the medical marketplace that they do in other markets, they still have the power to influence provider behavior. Take Medicare, which has a list of some 7,500 separate tasks it pays physicians to perform. For each task, there is a price that varies according to...
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Healthcare and the Cost of Non-Price Rationing

The orthodox approach to health policy is obsessively focused on the burdens of price barriers to care, and at the same time inordinately oblivious to the burdens of non-price barriers. Yet non-price barriers to care can be very costly. This is an important point that dooms many healthcare proposals, as I explain in my...
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  • MyGovCost.org
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  • OnPower.org
  • elindependent.org