Tag: Politics
Voice, Loyalty, Exit, and BLM

Like many Americans, I watched the events at the U.S. Capitol last week in disbelief. My husband, an immigrant, commented that what we witnessed was “why [my family] left Venezuela. This doesn’t happen in the United States.” He and others have also remarked at the stark difference between the police response to the mostly...
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Is It Time for Republicans to Move Past Trump?

People have different ideas about the appropriate role for government. Democratic political institutions allow citizens to express those ideas, albeit imperfectly, by campaigning, contributing monetarily, and voting for candidates and parties whose ideas correspond closely with their own. The troubling thing about many Trump supporters is that they appear to be supporting the man...
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Invoke the 25th Amendment?

There has been some talk about using the 25th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States to remove President Trump from office. The Amendment enables the vice president to do this with support from a majority of “principal officers of the executive department.” This is not going to happen, but I would not...
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Democratic Institutions and the Transition of Presidential Power

Donald Trump’s power as president of the United States comes from the fact that he was elected president, not because he is Donald Trump. President Trump’s presidential power will be transferred to Joe Biden on January 20 when Biden is inaugurated as the next president. Democratic government is governed by democratic institutions and people...
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Armed Consumer Affairs Cops Raid Stockton Salon

“Did anyone know the California Department of Consumer Affairs has its own armed police force?” wonders Katy Grimes of the California Globe. Vicki Kirk and Dino Ballin, owners of the Pomp Hair Salon in Stockton, found out the hard way.  They were raided by “armed, body armor-wearing cops from the Department of Consumer Affairs,...
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The Orwellian Redefinition of Court-Packing: Part II

A few weeks ago I wrote about the left’s Orwellian redefinition of court-packing here in The Beacon. Court-packing has meant an attempt to appoint additional Supreme Court Justices beyond the customary nine since 1937, when President Franklin Roosevelt proposed it to produce a Court more favorable to his initiatives.

Florida’s Governor DeSantis Chooses Liberty Over Mandates

As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, many governments are imposing (or reimposing) mandates, lockdowns, and in general, restrictions on business activity and personal behavior. Meanwhile, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has stood (mostly) firm in opposing government mandates.

The Presidential Election: Biden Didn’t Win; Trump Lost

In national elections, the U.S. president’s party normally picks up seats in the House of Representatives as they ride the president’s coattails to victory, and the president’s party typically loses House seats in mid-term elections, when the president is not on the ballot. Election results in the House can be seen as an indicator...
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Court Packing: The Left’s Orwellian Redefinition

Dictionary.com defines court packing as “an unsuccessful attempt by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937 to appoint up to six additional justices to the Supreme Court, which had invalidated a number of his New Deal laws.” In recent article in Harper’s Bazaar, Chelsey Sanchez writes, “Simply put, court packing refers to the process of...
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Democracy: Ideology and Reality

A romantic view of democracy is that it gives citizens control over their governments. Citizens decide who holds power, and if those who are elected do not carry out the will of the voters, democratic elections provide the mechanism to replace them. Elections provide the discipline that pushes elected representatives to represent the interests...
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  • Catalyst
  • MyGovCost.org
  • FDAReview.org
  • OnPower.org
  • elindependent.org