Tag: Nuclear Weapons
A Chance for Peace, 1953

On April 16, 1953, shortly after the death of Joseph Stalin, the U.S. government made a peace initiative outlined in a speech now recognized as one of the two most significant and memorable speeches of Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency. Historians continue to debate whether this initiative was a sincere effort to end the Cold...
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This Week in The Lighthouse: WikiLeaks, Right to Bear Arms, Trillion Dollar Foreign Policy, Venezuela

This week’s Lighthouse (available online here) touches on the WikiLeaks documents (Ivan Eland), the right to bear arms (Stephen Halbrook), the cost of U.S. foreign policy (Robert Higgs), and Hugo Chavez’s support of terrorists (Alvaro Vargas Llosa). Here are links to the individual items: Lessons from the WikiLeaks Docs Halbrook Lauded for Defense of...
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Data Don’t Bleed

I spent several hours today preparing a short article on defense spending for The Beacon, updating similar articles I wrote in 2004 and 2007. The subject matter required me to do a fair amount of work that most people no doubt would consider tedious—locating and cross-checking data, performing various arithmetic operations, checking my figures...
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The New Campaign Against Nuclear Weapons

In an article in the Wall Street Journal on January 4, 2007, “A World Free of Nuclear Weapons,” national security establishment icons George Shultz, William Perry, Henry Kissinger and Sam Nunn startled many people by calling for a campaign to ban nuclear weapons worldwide in a effort to avoid a new nuclear arms race...
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Was Harry Truman a War Criminal? Jon Stewart Says Yes, Then No

Jon Stewart has apologized for calling Harry Truman a war criminal during an interview with Clifford May. For Bill Whittle’s criticism of Stewart’s original statement, which helped to lead to Stewart’s capitulation, see the link at Jane Shaw’s post here Well...was Harry Truman a war criminal? In my view, it is not even a...
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August 9, 1945, a Date that Will Live in Infamy

I note with sadness that today is the sixty-third anniversary of the U.S. explosion of an atomic bomb over Nagasaki, Japan. The explosion killed an estimated 40,000 to 75,000 persons immediately, and perhaps as many as 80,000 died by the end of 1945 from the effects of their wounds and radiation sickness. Nearly all...
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Hurston and Paterson: Two Libertarians Against the Atomic Bomb

Novelists Zora Neale Hurston and Isabel Paterson had much in common including opposition to the New Deal and a shared belief individualism. Both also opposed the dropping of the atomic bomb. In 1946, Hurston, who later supported the presidential campaign of Robert A. Taft, wrote that she was “amazed at the complacency of Negro press...
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War with Iran—Still in the Cards?

There is some concern brewing that Vice President Dick Cheney’s recent tour of the Middle East is a prelude to war with Iran. The justification would likely be two-fold: Iran’s meddling in Iraq and other support for Islamist extremists, and its supposed nuclear weapons program. According to last November’s National Intelligence Estimate, Iran has...
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