How Soviets in 1960 Imagined 2017, and the Biggest Changes They Missed »

A 1960 Soviet filmstrip surfaced earlier this year depicting a vision of life in 2017. As Russia prepares for the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, it is interesting to reflect on the filmstrip to see what Soviet propagandists got right and what they got wrong. The 45-frame filmstrip, found in a family...
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Make No Mistake: Fidel Castro Was a Horrible Person »

Cuba’s former dictator, Fidel Castro, has died at the age of 90. When I woke up on Saturday morning to see the news, I was surprised by the reaction of many friends on social media, as well as the national media. The New York Times headline read, “Cuban Revolutionary Who Defied U.S., Dies at...
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In Memoriam: Robert A. Conquest (1917–2015) »

One of the great ironies of modern history is that the person most responsible for bringing to light the magnitude of Stalin’s terror is a man whose last name is synonymous with occupation and subjugation: Robert Conquest. In word and in deed, the world-renowned historian, who passed away on August 3 at the age...
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Ron Paul Deserves More Respect »

Although Ron Paul placed second in the Iowa straw poll, behind Michele Bachmann by the slimmest of margins, most media commentators—both left and right—refused to anoint him as one of the “big three” candidates remaining in the Republican presidential contest. Translated, the media gatekeepers, as they did in his 2008 campaign, are telling the...
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The Civilian and the Military: Foreword by Ralph Raico »

The following is the Foreword to the Independent Institute’s new printing of The Civilian and the Military: A History of the American Antimilitarist Tradition, by Arthur A. Ekirch, Jr. See also Anthony Gregory’s review on The Beacon. In 1783 a treaty ending hostilities between Great Britain and its rebellious colonies along the eastern seaboard...
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A Chance for Peace, 1953 »

On April 16, 1953, shortly after the death of Joseph Stalin, the U.S. government made a peace initiative outlined in a speech now recognized as one of the two most significant and memorable speeches of Dwight D. Eisenhower’s presidency. Historians continue to debate whether this initiative was a sincere effort to end the Cold...
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World War II: An Unspeakable Horror Now Encrusted in Myths »

September 1, 1939—exactly seventy years ago today—is customarily considered the day when World War II began, owing to the German invasion of Poland. Of course, some belligerents, most notably the Japanese and the Chinese, had already been at war for years, and others did not join the fray until later. The United States actually began...
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De-socialization of Russian Farms »

After nearly eighty years, the New York Times reports that Russia may now finally be moving to de-collectivize and privatize its farmlands. From 1928 to 1933, Stalin pursued a ruthless drive to collectivize all agriculture in the Soviet Union, and implemented a series of events in the Ukraine (“the breadbasket of Europe”) to crush...
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August 9, 1945, a Date that Will Live in Infamy »

I note with sadness that today is the sixty-third anniversary of the U.S. explosion of an atomic bomb over Nagasaki, Japan. The explosion killed an estimated 40,000 to 75,000 persons immediately, and perhaps as many as 80,000 died by the end of 1945 from the effects of their wounds and radiation sickness. Nearly all...
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