Tag: Rule of Law

Transcending Government — A Future of Competitive Governance Driven by “Governance Entrepreneurs” »

In a little-known 2006 World Bank report Where Is the Wealth of Nations? a team of economists provide a snapshot of wealth in 120 countries, and they find that governance is key. A full 46 percent of total wealth in high-income countries derives from the rule of law, the most important factor. This is an...
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50 Years Ago Today: The Detroit Riot and the Decline of Civil Rights Liberalism (III) »

(continued from Part II) After the Watts riot of 1965, bureaucrats in the administrative state (e.g., EEOC, Small Business Administration) created racial preferences in employment and lending programs based on their own administrative authority, not any explicit authorization from the Congress. Indeed, the Democratic majority (and the Republican minority) were adamantly opposed to racial discrimination...
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50 Years Ago Today: The Detroit Riot and the Decline of Civil Rights Liberalism (II) »

Throughout American history, government at all levels has used race to categorize, enslave, segregate, regulate human behavior, and limit immigration with “nationality” quotas that served as substitutes for race. Categorizing by race was essential to racist agendas.

In response, classical liberal civil rights activists struggled to eliminate government-mandated racial categories. They were anything but naive: racism was real, categories or no categories, but the government stamp of approval made things worse–and caused constant mischief in the ever increasing addition of group categories in the census or in immigration statutes. The only feasible solution was the most radical one: the complete elimination of government racial categories. Individuals might discriminate but would no longer have the support of the State. With time, classical liberals felt, the irrationality of racism and xenophobia would give way to better human relations.

50 Years Ago Today: The Detroit Riot and the Decline of Civil Rights Liberalism (I) »

Fifty years ago today (July 23, 1967), the largest urban riot of the 1960s rocked Detroit for five days (July 23-28). An encounter with the police (shutting down an illegal after-hours bar), sparked looting and arson on a scale far surpassing the riots that had burned in other American cities. While such riots often started with incidents involving law enforcement, the police were ordered—again and again—to stand down and let a small minority of African Americans loot property of small business owners (both black and white).

The Detroit Riot marked a turning point in how American policymakers dealt with race. The classical liberal tradition of civil rights, with its emphasis on rule of law and equal protection (regardless of race) gave way to policies that purposely treated minorities as “protected categories” deserving of treatment not accorded other citizens.

So-called Police Misconduct »

“Police misconduct” is a term one hears from time to time. Some people complain about it. Most, however, refer to it as simply a mistaken idea advanced by disgruntled ne’er-do-wells who refuse to accept that only a few “bad apples” among the police ever do anything wrong—and when they do it’s for altogether understandable...
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Congratulations to Mario Vargas Llosa on Receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature »

The 2010 Nobel Prize in Literature awarded to my father, Mario Vargas Llosa, is great news for those of us who value freedom. His work, as the Swedish Academy recognized in its public statement, explores the oppressive structures of power and the plight of the individual who rebels against them. His novels examine this...
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Judge Andrew Napolitano: Military Tribunals Are Unconstitutional »

In an article in the Los Angeles Times on November 29th, “The case against military tribunals,” Judge Andrew P. Napolitano presented his opposition to military tribunals in the U.S. government’s undeclared “war on terror.” It’s a violation of the Constitution to use the panels without a declaration of war—and just calling it a “war”...
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In Defense of Rules »

I have an article defending rules, order and the natural law, as opposed to state lawlessness, here.

The Formula for a Police State »

[NB: I wrote this piece for the Libertarian Perspective over a week ago. It hasn’t gone online yet, so I’m posting it here. Some updates at the bottom] The Formula for a Police State by Anthony Gregory On the night of March 15 in an Oceanside, California, parking lot, after a dispute over one...
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