Tag: Transportation

Economics 101: Uber’s Prices Don’t “Exploit” People »

The past few weeks have been full of travel—between Denver, Atlanta, Louisville, and Washington, D.C., I’ve had more than my fair share of layovers and flight delays. (I was also forced to contemplate what terrible thing I might have done to deserve sitting next to the woman who let out a scream every time...
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Airline Deregulation Act of 1978 »

President Jimmy Carter signed the Airline Deregulation Act on October 24, 1978. That law phased out the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) over the next four years, ending five decades of federal regulation of passenger airfares on interstate commercial flights and entry into the airline industry. One of prime movers behind this first legislative initiative...
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Fascism Is Efficient, Says Andres Duany, Leading Proponent of “Sustainable Development” »

It goes by many names: “sustainable development,” “smart growth,” “transit-oriented development,” to name a few. But development projects built under the banner of “sustainability” share the same elements: high-density residential housing and high-intensity commercial space (so-called mixed use) clustered near capital-intensive mass transit lines surrounded by government-owned “open space” and, increasingly, government-imposed “urban growth...
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Technology Can Make the Regulatory State Obsolete »

The late American inventor and futurist Buckminster Fuller said: “You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” Ridesharing services are trying to do this, but governments stand in the way. In a two-minute Perspective aired today on National Public Radio station KQED...
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A “Smart-Growth” Revolt in California »

On June 18, the Larkspur City Council voted unanimously to kill a high-density “smart-growth” development plan for this community of 12,000 people 16 miles north of San Francisco. The plan called for building 39,500 square feet of office space, 60,000 square feet of hotel space, 77,500 square feet of retail space, and up to...
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TSA Vet Admits Scanners Are a Joke. And So Are You (to the TSA). »

In a recent coming-out piece for the longtime anonymous blogger behind the site “Taking Sense Away”, “Dear America, I Saw You Naked. And yes, we were laughing. Confessions of an ex-TSA agent,” Jason Edward Harrington details his six years as a TSA agent at Chicago’s O’Hare airport. We knew the full-body scanners didn’t work...
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San Francisco Professor Compares BART Transit Workers to Slaves »

The two strikes by Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) unions during the recent contract negotiations have prompted a legislative campaign to ban strikes by public transit workers in California. John Logan, a professor and director of labor and employment studies at San Francisco State University, recently wrote an opinion piece opposing a ban for...
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Generous Contract Offer Still Not Enough for BART Hostage Takers »

On Friday, about 2,400 union workers with the Oakland/San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system went on strike for the second time in four months. The unions—the Service Employees International Union and Amalgamated Transit Union—represent BART station agents, train operators, mechanics, maintenance workers, and professional staff. The striking workers are unhappy with BART’s...
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Time for Taxpayer Protections on California Transportation Projects »

The new span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is $5 billion over its original budget and nine years past its initial completion date. Such massive cost overruns and delays have shocked the public but one key question never gets asked, or answered: Why should taxpayers be on the hook for overruns? They shouldn’t,...
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Time To Unload the BART Gravy Train »

Last week’s Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) strike created the world’s largest parking lot, as 400,000 commuters who usually ride BART trains each day sat in cars and buses trying to move through the gridlocked Oakland/San Francisco Bay Area. Last Friday, the two striking unions agreed to return to work for 30 days while...
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