Tag: The State

The Hayekian Liberty of Ender’s Game »

Finally, after much encouragement from my college freshman daughter, I just finished reading Ender’s Game, the best-selling science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card that won the Nebula and Hugo awards when it was published in the mid-1980s. The story follows the cultivation of a 6-year-old, boy-wonder, military tactician, Andrew “Ender” Wiggin, as he...
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TSA Vet Admits Scanners Are a Joke. And So Are You (to the TSA). »

In a recent coming-out piece for the longtime anonymous blogger behind the site “Taking Sense Away”, “Dear America, I Saw You Naked. And yes, we were laughing. Confessions of an ex-TSA agent,” Jason Edward Harrington details his six years as a TSA agent at Chicago’s O’Hare airport. We knew the full-body scanners didn’t work...
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Against Libertarian Infighting »

Like any ideology that has attracted a substantial following, libertarianism has splintered into a variety of sects. Thus, there are hard-core and soft-core libertarians; plumb-line and big-tent libertarians; Rothbard-loving and Rothbard-hating libertarians; pro-political and anti-political libertarians; academic and movement libertarians; thick and thin libertarians; socially conventional and libertine libertarians; pro-war and anti-war libertarians; bleeding-heart...
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Stalin Apologia »

Salon.com published a truly disgusting article on the supposed myths of communism. There are a lot of problems with it, but I’ll focus on this particularly revolting passage, which might seem literally true if you drop the context of what it suggests: For one thing, a large number of the people killed under Soviet...
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Believe It: NSA Collects and Stores Content, Not Just “Metadata” »

President Obama has repeatedly attempted to obfuscate the issue of NSA’s actively spying on Americans by repeatedly referring to “metadata”: information about where, when and to whom people make phone calls, but not the actual phone conversations. Most recently, he garnered wide press coverage by promising to limit the collection of phone metadata. But...
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Common Ground »

I often find myself disagreeing with Cynthia Tucker, the Progressive journalist and professor, so I was happy to read a recent column of hers, on the farm bill that just passed the House, and find that she and I share some common ground on our views toward government. She considers the bill an example...
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State of the Union 2014: More Preschool Politics? »

Pundits are predicting that President Obama will try to recycle last year’s universal, government-run preschool plan in tonight’s State of the Union address. The Los Angeles Times’ Kathleen Hennessey, for example, isn’t jazzed: Little of what the president proposes in his most high-profile speech of the year is likely to get done, at least...
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Governor Stevens and I »

When Governor Isaac Stevens went around Puget Sound in the mid-1850s making treaties with the Indian tribes to clear the way for an anticipated influx of whites, he found again and again that asking for the tribal chief got him nowhere. The Indians would look around and shrug their shoulders. They had no chiefs....
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Stockman: Cronyism Is Destroying American Capitalism and American Democracy »

I’ve recently read David Stockman’s book, The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America. (You can buy it at Amazon, but it’s cheaper at the Mises Institute.) Stockman explains how cronyism has grown throughout the 20th century in America, placing much blame on the Federal Reserve, and describing how businesses have managed to...
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President Obama on Inequality: Rhetoric vs. Reality »

President Obama has recently promoted inequality as a fundamental threat to our way of life, saying, “The combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the American Dream, our way of life, and what we stand for around the globe.” You can read the rhetoric here. Let’s look at...
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