Tag: Science

Out of the Mouths of Bureaucrats »

Any day now I’m going to be accused of being a one-note blogger, but the TSA is just providing too much material to pass up. (Just for the record, I’m also known to post on Regime Uncertainty, education, the Census, and other issues.) Case in point: the TSA’s own blog, where “Blogger Bob”—presumably the...
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Nanny State Attacks Jewish, Muslim Manhood »

This week, a “God blogger” published a Wall Street Journal column highlighting the “circumcision wars” in California. The “intactivists” opposed to circumcision are up against Jews and Muslims (among others) in San Francisco. I’m betting with the latter groups. I think circumcision is barbaric and demeaning to men but it doesn’t rise to the...
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Australian Government Climate Scientist: Carbon Warming Too Minor to Be Worth Worrying About »

A self-described former climate alarmist, now skeptic, Dr. David Evans served as a full-time consultant for the Australian Greenhouse Office (now the Department of Climate Change) from 1999 to 2005, and part-time from 2008 to 2010, modelling Australia’s carbon. He is a mathematician and engineer, with six university degrees, including a Ph.D. from Stanford...
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Why Johnny Can’t Read: State Legislators’ Skewed Priorities »

In the 2009 “Nation’s Report Card” of students’ achievement, by state, produced by the U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, Californian students ranked 49th in reading—ahead only of Hawaii and the District of Columbia—and above only Mississippi in science. One would think that those kind of statistics would focus all attention on...
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Objectivity, Probability, and Scholarship »

I’m pausing from completing a faculty survey to offer a couple of quick thoughts on the following directive. I’m to register the degree to which I agree with the statement “Private funding sources often prevent researchers from being completely objective in the conduct of their work.” My options are “Agree Strongly, Agree Somewhat, Disagree...
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Truth, Goodness, and Beauty »

In a very good, new article in the Times of London, “Philosophers are finding fresh meanings in truth, beauty and goodness,” philosopher John Cottingham (University of Reading) discusses the fact that the absurdities of what has dominated philosophy and the bulk of intellectual and political culture for at least two hundred years are increasingly...
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A Harvard First that the University Rarely Touts »

In 1943, a team of chemists at Harvard University led by Louis Fieser produced napalm, and thereby beat out competing teams at DuPont and Standard Oil in a government competition for its development. Like many scientists who have worked on weapons development for the government, Fieser was unapologetic, even when the U.S. military’s use of...
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Remember Those 2001 Anthrax Attacks? »

In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, Americans were gripped by hysteria, unsure of where and when the next attack might come. Nothing contributed to this climate of fear as did the anthrax attacks that began exactly one week after the Twin Towers fell. Five were killed, seventeen others were infected, and letters containing the...
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Morris David Morris (February 10, 1921 — March 12, 2011) »

I was saddened to learn of the recent death of Morris David Morris, who was my colleague in the Department of Economics at the University of Washington for thirteen of the fifteen years I spent there. Morris was my closest personal friend on the faculty at the UW, notwithstanding our differences of age, background, experience,...
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Happy Birthday, Ronald Coase and Thank You for Our Logo! »

Ronald Coase, winner of the 1991 Nobel Prize in Economic Science, turns 100 today, still publishing. As The Economist magazine pointed out in its recent tribute to his work on firms: He has long chided his fellow economists for scrawling hieroglyphics on blackboards rather than looking at what it actually takes to run a...
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