Tag: Regulation

Government Spending and Regime Uncertainty—a Clarification »

In view of my sixteen-year campaign to bring about an understanding of the idea of “regime uncertainty,” one might think that I would be gratified by the growing recognition of the importance of the closely related (but narrower) idea of “policy uncertainty” in relation to the unusually slow recovery from the bust of 2007-2009....
Read More »

Victory! The Independent Institute’s Longtime Opposition to Inclusionary Housing Policies Lays Groundwork for Governor’s Veto »

On Sunday, Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed Assembly Bill 1229, a measure that would have authorized California cities and counties to establish inclusionary housing requirements as a condition of development, allowing them to force housing developers to set aside units for low-income residents. The Independent Institute, and especially its Senior Fellow Benjamin W. Powell, provided...
Read More »

Why Do We Need a Health Insurance Mandate? »

It is widely assumed that a health insurance mandate is necessary in any workable health care system and that it is especially needed if insurance companies are not allowed to price their premiums based on health status, as is the case under the Affordable Care Act. Yet most countries in the world do not...
Read More »

Are Patients Too Dumb to Make Good Choices? »

Austin Frakt refers us to this statement from a study of complexity in various markets: The idea of consumer-directed health care, however, is going in the opposite direction in that it increases complexity for consumers, and possibly for clinicians. Using other markets as benchmarks, we would expect this push to fail, or at least...
Read More »

All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Reading Higgs »

Further to Bob Higgs’s earlier post, Thinking Is Research, Too!, down in Texas, the Chairman of the Dallas Fed has the odd practice of looking beyond government stats and actually (gasp!) asking real people how they think the economy is going. From a profile of the President and CEO of the Dallas Fed, Richard...
Read More »

Thinking Is Research, Too! »

Bill Parker, an old friend of mine who died in 2000, was director of graduate studies in economics at Yale for thirteen years. He told me once about his struggles with his colleagues, who, he believed, were spending too much time on technique and not enough time on substance in teaching their courses. The...
Read More »

Community Rating and the Pathology of Price Controls »

If there is a single issue that most divides economists from non-economists, it’s the way they view prices. Economists view prices as creators of incentives for buyers and sellers. When prices change behavior changes. As a result, prices are mechanisms for determining the allocation of resources. If they are not allowed to perform this...
Read More »

ObamaCare Ruling Just Killed Portable Health Insurance »

Although it is rarely discussed by the national health media, a quiet revolution in how health insurance is purchased has been underway for several years now. Specifically, employers have been using Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) to allow their employees to purchase individually owned health insurance. A number of states, including Colorado, have expressly passed...
Read More »

New Book Exposes the ‘Terrible 10′ Worst U.S. Economic Policy Mistakes »

Despite enjoying impressive economic growth over the past century, Americans have also been the victims of scores of stupid government mistakes that have made them poorer. For many the blunders led only to temporary setbacks, but for others the errors created life-altering disasters from which they never recovered. In the new book The Terrible...
Read More »

Young Adults and ObamaCare »

Tell Us Again Why We Need Young People “This only works if young people show up,” said Bill Clinton the other day. He was explaining ObamaCare. On the surface that’s an odd thing to say. Medicare seems to work just fine without a lot of young people. It needs taxes from young people, of...
Read More »