Tag: Regulation

The Median Voter, the Marginal Consumer, and Obamacare: Why No Politician Competes for the Votes of Patients with Bladder Cancer »

On October 30, President Obama gave a now infamous speech celebrating the going out of business of so-called “bad apple” insurers. According to the President, “before the Affordable Care Act, these bad apple insurers had free rein every single year to limit the care that you received or used minor pre-existing conditions to jack...
Read More »

Just Say No to Jobs for the Young and Unskilled »

As pictured here, Governor Jerry Brown has signed new minimum wage legislation that ups the minimum productivity to be employed in California to $9 per hour starting next year, and $10 per hour in 2016. Supervisors will also have to increase their productivity if they want to stay employed. The San Francisco Chronicle offers...
Read More »

California Energy Officials Repeat Lies to Expand Their Power »

California is ranked second in a nationwide scorecard on energy efficiency released yesterday by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, a D.C.-based group that works to advance efficiency efforts. Massachusetts retains the top spot for the third year in a row. Andrew McAllister, a member of the California Energy Commission, attributed California’s second-place...
Read More »

A Woman May Die Because of Obamacare »

For the past 20 years I have been trying to convince my colleagues in the health policy community that managed competition contains perverse economic incentives. These incentives do more than misallocate resources. They create ominous risks for the health and safety of patients with serious medical conditions. Consider the editorial in Monday’s Wall Street...
Read More »

The “Rs”: Understanding the Death Spiral in the Obamacare Exchanges »

One month after the worst product launch in modern history (yes, worse than “New Coke”), the big question is: Will the federal government be able to rescue health insurers who will lose lots of money in the Obamacare exchanges? At the beginning of the Obamacare negotiations, insurers recognized that their actuaries would have trouble...
Read More »

The “Deep State” in American Health Care »

In a recent blog entry, the Wall Street Journal’s Peggy Noonan suggested the existence of a “deep state” within the national-security apparatus of the U.S. government. Usually, the “deep state” refers to a function of the Turkish Army, which was re-organized by Kemal Ataturk after the defeat of the Ottoman Empire in the First...
Read More »

“Creepy Uncle Sam” Is Back Just in Time for Halloween! »

Following up on the earlier videos that went viral regarding the looming threat of Obamacare, here is the newest one involving “Creepy Uncle Sam,” “Halloween Horror 2013 – Get The Door, Chad”: For the pivotal alternative to Obamacare, please see the Independent Institute’s widely acclaimed book: Priceless: Curing the Healthcare Crisis, by John C....
Read More »

Why the Exchanges Are a Mess and a Very Simple Alternative »

More than one commentator has remarked on the puzzling way the Obama presidency has dealt with online technology. When it comes to elections, the Obama campaign’s use of the Internet was state of the art — doing what had never been done before. Yet when it comes to the Obamacare exchanges, the administration has...
Read More »

More on How Obamacare Is Affecting Jobs »

Just over the weekend, Paul Krugman was again claiming that Obamacare is not affecting the labor market in a blog post entitled Lies, Damned Lies, and Fox News. Yet Jed Graham notes that: [R]eport after report has rolled in about employers restricting work hours to fewer than 30 per week — the point where...
Read More »

Death Spirals »

A death spiral occurs when pricing in an insurance market spins out of control. If an insurance pool turns out to be more expensive than originally thought, the insurer must raise its premiums. As the premium rises, some healthy people drop their coverage. With a sicker group of enrollees, the average cost per enrollee...
Read More »