Tag: Public Opinion

National School Choice Week Starts Today! »

This week more than 11,000 events will be held nationwide in celebration of school choice. Also, for the first time ever, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a resolution recognizing January 25-30, 2015, as National School Choice Week to help improve awareness of the benefits of greater opportunities in education. More than 100 governors, mayors,...
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Are Falling Prices a Bad Thing? »

Popular opinion seems to be that falling prices—or even stable prices—are bad for the economy, but I’ve never seen any good arguments about why. I’ve just read another article about this, that gives six clearly numbered reasons, so let’s look at what the article says to see if they hold up.

Self Censorship »

One by-product of the Paris terrorist attack on Charlie Hebdo was an outpouring of support for freedom of speech. While there was general agreement that the magazine’s content has been, beyond a doubt, offensive to some (and not only Muslims), almost everyone agreed that freedom of speech is a fundamental right that should be...
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One Benefit of Freedom of Speech and Freedom of the Press... »

... is that you know who your enemies and opponents are. They will speak out against your ideas, your actions, or maybe just you on a personal level. One reason we value these freedoms is that they help make those in power accountable. Those who disagree with particular policies or actions can say so...
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Normalizing Relations with Cuba: Good Policy »

President Obama announced that the United States will restore full diplomatic relations with Cuba, which is a good move for both countries. The economic impact of the policy will be limited, however, because the economic embargo the United States has imposed on Cuba can be removed only by Congress. This presents the obvious political...
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Anti-Government Movements »

The past five years have seen four major anti-government movements gain momentum. These movements have not been revolutionary movements, but rather movements that pushed to limit the scope of government in various ways. The Tea Party movement began in 2009 with the motivation of electing candidates to office who supported a reduction in the...
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Gallup: Obamacare Hurting the Middle Class »

Gallup reports that more Americans are delaying medical care because of cost. It is now 33 percent of respondents, versus only 19 percent in 2001. Some would love to blame this on consumer-driven health plans, which shift medical spending from premiums, which run through insurers’ bureaucracies, to patients’ direct control. However, this increase in...
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Stores to Open on Thanksgiving—Don’t Complain. »

Over the past several weeks, the standard litany of holiday media stories has begun. While there is always some fun in guessing which reporter will get stuck with the “don’t set your house on fire with the deep fryer” segment, other stories are far more troubling. Around Thanksgiving and the start of the Christmas...
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Lesson from the Election: People Want Less Government »

The lesson I draw from the Republican victories in the 2014 election is that people want less government. Since 2009 the number of Democratic Senators fell from 58 to 45, the number of democratic House members fell from 256 to 192, and the number of Democratic governors fell from 28 to 18. I’m not...
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Public Schools and Government Schools »

Earlier this year, I was saddened by the passing of Stanley Marshall, founder of the James Madison Institute, an organization that promotes individual freedom in Florida. Stan was president of Florida State University from 1969-1976, and went into private business before founding the James Madison Institute in 1987. I have worked with the Institute...
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