Tag: Medicaid

Is Medicaid Crowd-Out the Only Effect of Obamacare? »

Medicaid “crowd-out” is the hypothesis that enrolling more people in Medicaid will cause some people to drop private coverage in favor of Medicaid. The rate of crowding out may reach 60 percent. Now, courtesy of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), we have evidence that the entire effect of Obamacare so far is to...
Read More »

What If More States Had Set Up Their Own Obamacare Exchanges? »

Politico’s Kyle Cheney and Jennifer Haberkorn have made the case that Republican non-collaboration with Obamacare has brought a completely federally controlled healthcare system closer to reality: Right now, 36 states rely on HealthCare.gov, the federal exchange, to enroll people in health coverage. At least two more states are opting in next year, with a...
Read More »

Piketty’s Capital: IV »

I’ve made some observations about Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century already, here, here, and here, and in this post want to note the way that the twentieth-century welfare state has contributed to the inequality that Piketty has observed. Piketty observes that growing inequality is the result of the return on capital being...
Read More »

Obamacare’s Cost Is Down 8%, but That May Not Be Good News »

But so is access to doctors and hospitals in the plans offered on the health insurance exchanges. A Congressional Budget Office report estimates lower federal spending (see the figure). The reason: Health plans in the exchanges look more like Medicaid than like employer-based coverage. Jason Millman reports: The CBO report points out that it...
Read More »

Let’s Start a Tax Revolt with Our iPhones »

Tax Day is upon us and at the federal level we’re told that Washington spends $3.5 trillion a year. The annual federal deficit stands at $514 billion. The national debt has climbed to $17.6 trillion. All of these numbers are staggering, and that’s the problem. Few people can relate to such large numbers because...
Read More »

Uninsured Patients Are 36 Percent More Likely To Get Medical Appointments Than Are Medicaid Patients »

According to data compiled by the Kaiser Family Foundation, in fiscal year 2010 the average Medicaid payment per enrollee was $5,563. To be sure, there was a wide variance: For aged Medicaid enrollees the average payment was $12,958, and for disabled enrollees it was $16,240. The average for adults was $3,025, and for children...
Read More »

Medicaid Patients’ Access to Specialists Has Dropped Almost One-Fifth in Five Years »

According to Merritt Hawkins’ 2014 survey of physician appointment times in fifteen urban markets (press release here, full report available by request from the firm), the proportion of physicians in five specialties (cardiology, dermatology, orthopedic surgery, ob/gyn, and family practice) accepting Medicaid patients dropped from 55.4 percent in 2009 to 45.7 percent — a drop...
Read More »

Can Obamacare Be Fixed? Part II »

The reason we have so many problems in health care is that almost everywhere we look, people face perverse incentives—patients, doctors, employers, employees, etc. When they respond to those incentives, they do things that make costs higher, quality lower, and access to care more difficult than otherwise would have been the case. At the...
Read More »

The Coming U.S. Government Default? »

Social Security, Medicare, and the federal component of Medicaid are easily the leading sources of the U.S. government’s worsening fiscal nightmare. By 2037, the ongoing growth in spending for these programs will have pushed up total federal spending to 35.7 percent of GDP, according to the Congressional Budget Office. This share is about 75...
Read More »

Take the Money and Run? GAO Reports Significant Dropping Out of Government Electronic Health Records Program »

A previous blog entry noted that Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense have utterly failed to execute a plan to develop an interoperable Electronic Health Record (EHR), despite five million beneficiaries receiving health benefits from both bureaucracies. Despite its inability to manage this for two closely related federal departments, the federal government decided...
Read More »