Tag: Education

Health and Higher Education »

We spend about twice as much as other developed countries as a fraction of national output. Yet our results are mediocre. Public and private spending is growing much faster than our income ― putting us on a course that is clearly unsustainable. It appears we are buying quantity instead of value. Outcomes vary wildly...
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Explaining College Cost Inflation »

Tuition at America’s institutions of higher learning, both public and private, has been rising faster than any other component of the cost of living, including healthcare, for about two decades. There are many explanations for this currently on offer, such as reductions in teaching loads for senior faculty members, but that can’t be the...
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Press Coverage of Florida’s Fiscally Conservative Governor Rick Scott »

Florida Governor Rick Scott seems surprisingly unpopular after doing just what he said he’d do when he ran for election in 2010. He has cut taxes, reduced many government programs in a state that already has a lean state government, and under his watch Florida’s unemployment rate has fallen from above the national average...
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Jim Crow and the Progressives »

Historians often speak glowingly about the Progressive movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Typically they write off the racist statements made by many of its leaders—Herbert Croly, John Dewey, Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and others—as minor “blind spots” unrelated to Progressivism. But perhaps the apologist historians also have trouble seeing clearly....
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Robert William Fogel (July 1, 1926 – June 11, 2013) »

Robert Fogel died a few days ago. He was a prominent figure in the academic economic history profession for five decades, virtually from the time he burst onto the scene with the publication of a polished-up version of his Johns Hopkins Ph.D. dissertation, Railroads and American Economic Growth, in 1964. This book was the...
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The Hubris of Policymakers Often Harms the Poor »

Most people in public policy do not understand complex systems. They really don’t understand social science models either. As a result, the idea that a policy based on good intentions could actually make things worse is beyond their comprehension. Take health policies designed for low-income patients. Through our insistence on pushing low-income families into...
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Goodbye, “America’s Most Challenging High School.” Hello, Ebonics? »

The school rated “America’s Most Challenging High School” by the Washington Post is about to get an extreme makeover. With the surrounding Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) producing a drop-out rate double that for the rest of California, the American Indian Model Charter School clearly poses an embarrassment to the OUSD’s unionized teachers and...
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Students: Break Free This Summer! »

Join the Independent Institute this summer for its college seminars in Colorado Springs and Berkeley. These five-day programs feature lectures, readings, multimedia presentations, and group discussions on the fundamentals of free societies. Students will learn about ethics and liberty, Austrian economics, public choice, money and banking, the follies of socialism and interventionism, myths of...
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Texas Tech Free Market Institute »

In January I left Suffolk University to start the new Free Market Institute at Texas Tech University. I remain affiliated as a Senior Fellow with the Independent Institute and plan to continue my productive relationship with them well into the future. Since I’ve continued to write commentary for Independent some of you might have...
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Armen Alchian (April 12, 1914 – February 19, 2013) »

Arline Alchian Hoel reports that her father, Armen Alchian, “passed away peacefully in his sleep early this morning at his home in Los Angeles.” He was 98 years old. Armen Alchian was a major figure in the economics profession for more than half a century. At UCLA, where he spent his academic career as...
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