Tag: Economics

Joseph Stiglitz: The Price of Inequality »

Although Joseph Stiglitz has a reputation as one of the most prominent defenders of big government, I found much to agree with in his book, The Price of Inequality. It does appear to me that throughout the political spectrum, from left to right, there is a substantial consensus that government is the cause of...
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The Independent Review — Spring 2014 Issue Now Available »

The Spring 2014 issue of The Independent Review, the Independent Institute’s quarterly journal, has just been printed and is en route to subscribers. Here’s a quick look at the contents: Is the near extermination of the North American bison a clear example of “the tragedy of the commons”? No, not if, like Peter J....
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New Faculty for 2014 Challenge of Liberty Student Seminars »

Every year, the Independent Institute’s Challenge of Liberty Student Seminars become a forum for students to learn the foundations of a free and prosperous society. These seminars are inspiring, challenging, and fun—in large part because the speakers we invite are exceptionally devoted to teaching and mentoring students. In 2014, three new speakers will join...
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Challenge of Liberty Student Seminars—Application Deadline: March 31 »

The Challenge of Liberty Student Seminars are returning for another exciting season! Thanks to the generous support of donors, we will hold two seminars for college students — one at the University of Denver (June 16–20) and one at the University of California, Berkeley (July 7–11) — and one seminar for high-school students at...
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President Obama’s Investment Skills »

After the Obama administration bailed out General Motors by purchasing a 60.8% ownership share in the company for $49.5 billion, President Obama said, “We expect taxpayers will get back all the money my administration has invested in GM.” (I do like the way the president takes responsibility for the investment.) Now, the president’s administration...
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Intergenerational Transfers and Political Support for the Welfare State »

Supporters of the welfare state might see it as a mechanism for transferring income from rich to poor with the idea of helping those at the bottom end of the income distribution, but in the United States, the welfare state is increasingly transferring income from the young to the old, regardless of the wealth...
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Speak Loudly and Carry a Small Stick »

At the beginning of the twentieth century, President Teddy Roosevelt’s foreign policy was, “Speak softly and carry a big stick.” At the beginning of the twenty-first, President Obama’s policy appears to the the opposite: “Speak loudly and carry a small stick.” President Obama threatened Syria not to step over a “red line” by using...
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The Hayekian Liberty of Ender’s Game »

Finally, after much encouragement from my college freshman daughter, I just finished reading Ender’s Game, the best-selling science fiction novel by Orson Scott Card that won the Nebula and Hugo awards when it was published in the mid-1980s. The story follows the cultivation of a 6-year-old, boy-wonder, military tactician, Andrew “Ender” Wiggin, as he...
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Krugman: “Why aren’t wages going up?” »

In his New York Times column yesterday, Princeton economist Paul Krugman argues that unprecedented extended unemployment benefits can’t have been the cause of the unprecedented average duration of unemployment during the “Great Recession.” He reasons, “If unemployment is high because people are unwilling to work, reducing the supply of labor, why aren’t wages going...
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Common Ground »

I often find myself disagreeing with Cynthia Tucker, the Progressive journalist and professor, so I was happy to read a recent column of hers, on the farm bill that just passed the House, and find that she and I share some common ground on our views toward government. She considers the bill an example...
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