Tag: American History

Donald S. Barnhart (July 18, 1925 – September 8, 2009) »

In the fall of 1963, I transferred from Fresno State College, where I had recently completed my sophomore year, and enrolled in San Francisco State College, where I studied for two years and then was graduated in 1965. By the beginning of my senior year, I had already completed all of the requirements for...
Read More »

The Myth of the Civil Libertarian Democrat »

J.D. Tuccille has an insightful post prompted by a progressive blogger’s admonition against left-liberals working with libertarians to protest the NSA. Watson, the progressive, warns that “the presence of anti-government laissez-faire wingers at the beating heart of the privacy movement will surely sour the very political actors that movement desperately needs to make actual....
Read More »

The Ugly Beginning of Dodger Stadium Provides Important Property Rights Lesson »

Game three of the National League Championship Series will be played tonight at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. TBS play-by-play announcer Ernie Johnson and others often interchangeably refer to Dodger Stadium as Chavez Ravine. But they don’t explain the stadium’s ugly beginnings. Two miles from downtown Los Angeles, Chavez Ravine had been used in...
Read More »

All I Really Need to Know I Learned from Reading Higgs »

Further to Bob Higgs’s earlier post, Thinking Is Research, Too!, down in Texas, the Chairman of the Dallas Fed has the odd practice of looking beyond government stats and actually (gasp!) asking real people how they think the economy is going. From a profile of the President and CEO of the Dallas Fed, Richard...
Read More »

Thinking Is Research, Too! »

Bill Parker, an old friend of mine who died in 2000, was director of graduate studies in economics at Yale for thirteen years. He told me once about his struggles with his colleagues, who, he believed, were spending too much time on technique and not enough time on substance in teaching their courses. The...
Read More »

New Book Exposes the ‘Terrible 10′ Worst U.S. Economic Policy Mistakes »

Despite enjoying impressive economic growth over the past century, Americans have also been the victims of scores of stupid government mistakes that have made them poorer. For many the blunders led only to temporary setbacks, but for others the errors created life-altering disasters from which they never recovered. In the new book The Terrible...
Read More »

The Standing Army Marches On »

When the Constitution’s Framers adopted the 3rd Amendment, prohibiting the peacetime quartering of soldiers, they had fresh on their minds the experience of the British occupation of Boston, the use of armed enforcers to conduct searches without traditionally restrictive warrants, and the overall spectacle of government officials heavily armed in a military capacity patrolling...
Read More »

The Emperor in Denial »

President Obama tries to have it both ways when talking of American foreign policy. He sold himself to the public in 2008 as a more prudential steward of U.S. power. He would avoid “dumb wars,” as he had called the Iraq fiasco in a speech years before. He would save money by bringing the...
Read More »

The Panthers Were Right and Reagan Was Wrong on Gun Control »

I suppose it takes a true radical these days to question the progressive’s sacred cow: Ronald Reagan. You read that right. This paradigm of modern conservatism was one of the most important American champions of gun control in recent decades, and so he has become a convenient talking point for liberals who want to...
Read More »

Infringed: Second Amendment in the Crosshairs »

In 1996, Australia imposed some of the world’s most severe gun bans and restrictions. The only problem: no criminals heeded the policy. Now, says New South Wales Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione, “Guns have fallen into the hands of organized crime, outlaw motorcycle gangs, mid-level crime groups and petty thieves.” The lesson? Gun controls weaken...
Read More »