John R. Graham Archive

John R. Graham is a Senior Fellow at The Independent Institute.
Full biography and recent publications

92 Percent of Nurses Are Dissatisfied with Electronic Health Records



Although we have discussed their dissatisfaction with electronic health records, hospitals and physicians are not the only victims of the federal government’s $30 billion adventure in underwriting poor IT investments. Nurses are almost uniformly disappointed in EHRs, according to a new survey by Black Book Market Research: Dissatisfaction with inpatient electronic health record systems...
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Australia to Raise $5 Billion by Privatizing Its Biggest Health Insurer



Australia’s federal government is aiming to raise almost $5 billion by privatizing the country’s largest health insurer: Australia hopes to raise up to Aus$5.51 billion (US$4.82 billion) through the sale of the country’s largest health insurer in an initial public offering, Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said Monday. Cormann said the sale would remove the...
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Is Medicaid-Associated Overuse of Emergency Departments Just a Surge?



Research from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research suggests that rising Medicaid dependency does not result in a secular increase in use of hospitals’ emergency departments. Rather, the jump in ED use is just pent-up demand being satisfied, and drops off. This is the conclusion of a study that examined ED visits by...
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The Case for Drugstore Clinics



In The Atlantic, Richard Gunderman, MD, PhD, has delivered “The Case Against Drugstore Clinics.” It is a weak case. Let’s take his strongest argument first: A woman with a sore throat went to a retail clinic and received a prescription for antibiotics. After a few days, she hadn’t gotten better, so she went to...
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Hospital Administrative Costs Are Highest in the United States



The Commonwealth Fund has sponsored yet another study that concludes that the U.S. health system is less efficient than others. This time, the measurement is specifically hospitals’ administrative costs. As always, it recommends single-payer, government monopoly as the solution. Readers of this blog know that I am not about to defend hospitals’ bloated administrative costs....
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Federal “Open Payments” Website Stumbles Out of the Starting Gate



The federal government has launched an intrusive and mischievous Open Payments website, where payments for consulting and similar services provided by doctors to pharmaceutical and medical-device makers are publicized. Paul Keckley aptly summarizes the recent data dump from the Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services (CMS): In the last five months of 2013, drug manufacturers...
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A New Obamacare Lawsuit from the Former Top Obamacrat



Here’s one from the “you can’t make this up” files: The Department of Health and Human Services is in the spotlight for claims it is violating the Affordable Care Act. The lawsuit was filed by Mehri & Skalet attorney Jay Angoff, who used to oversee ACA implementation for HHS. Filed on behalf of a...
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Obamacare Might Have Enrolled Only 2.3 Million; Spent $73 Billion to Save Less Than $6 Billion in Uncompensated Care



According to the latest report from the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), it looks like the number of people who bought subsidized private insurance on Obamacare’s exchanges is only 2.3 million: “Based on an estimated 10.3 million decrease in the total number of uninsured and an estimated 8 million increase in the number...
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More Evidence That Medicaid Expansion Increases Emergency Department Use



The evidence that Medicaid expansion increases use of hospitals’ emergency departments is coming fast and thick. Hospital executives are longer afraid to admit it, and have given up the pretense that Medicaid increases timely, quality, primary care. Here’s one data point from Fort Smith, Arkansas: Almost a year after the first health insurance enrollment...
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Hospitals Are Cutting Charity Care and Using Emergency Rooms More



Hospitals, inveterate lobbyists for Obamacare, have responded rationally to its incentives: They have increased use of their emergency departments, and cut charity care. On Tuesday, NPR had a feature on hospitals’ using online services to allow frequent flyers to book appointments with emergency departments: Three times in one week, 34-year-old Michael Granillo returned to the emergency...
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