Archive for August, 2010

Abolish the TSA »

This latest outrage just reminds us of the folly of government airline security. Supposedly there to protect us against terrorists, the TSA works with police and law enforcement agencies when it detects behavior it deems suspicious—which in many cases can lead to crackdowns on victimless crimes or invasions into the private lives of travelers....
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C.S. Lewis on Mere Liberty and the Evils of Statism, Part 3 (Final) »

Here Is the Final Part Continued from Part 2: Part 1 Scientism For Lewis, science should be a quest for knowledge, and his concern was that in the modern era science is too often used instead as a quest by some for power over others. Lewis did not dispute that science is an immensely...
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An Eventual Korean Unification? It’s Complicated... »

... and it’s not going to happen. I attended a conference in Seoul last week, and all outward signs are that the Koreans there view themselves, with those in the North, as a part of one Korean nation, one people, temporarily living under divided government. The people refer to their country as Korea (not...
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The Iraq War Is Over »

Of course, not really. But Obama’s August deadline for the end of the war has passed and now all the U.S. troops are no longer “combat” forces but rather “transition forces.” Similarly, next July there is supposed to be a drawdown in Afghanistan—but who can believe it will be any more than some cosmetic...
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C.S. Lewis on Mere Liberty and the Evils of Statism, Part 2 »

Continued from Part 1: Part 3 Moral Relativism and Utilitarianism Of central importance in Lewis’s discussion of natural law is his critique of the moral relativism of utilitarianism (“the end justifies the means”) as a theory of ethics and guide to behavior. Lewis claimed that the precepts of moral ethics cannot just be innovated...
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Did North Korea Sink the Cheonan? »

On March 26, 2010, the South Korean patrol boat Cheonan sank, resulting in the death of 46 South Korean sailors. The South Korean government said the Cheonan was sunk by a North Korean torpedo. As this story reports, South Korea will release a final report of about 250 pages, detailing the findings of 74...
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This Week in The Lighthouse: Obamacare, Renewable Energy, Ground Zero Mosque, Counterinsurgency Strategy »

Time for a pop quiz. What does Alvaro Vargas Llosa think about efforts to block the so-called Ground Zero mosque? What does Ivan Eland think U.S. foreign-policy leaders can learn from the military’s counterinsurgency operations? What does Dominick Armentano think about the prospects of the state lawsuits against Obamacare? What does S. Fred Singer...
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Puritanism = Constructivism? »

This book also highlights two enduring alternative paradigms about the fundamental nature of economic systems. The early Puritans had viewed the market essentially as a human activity, and, as such, less than perfect. That being assumed, economic behavior needed boundaries defined by human institutions (churches and governments). The impact of commerce on the local...
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More Economists Join Higgs’s Call to “Do Nothing” »

The Wall Street Journal has been polling economists throughout the recession on their forecasts, including for unemployment—which have not been very accurate—as well as advice on government policy. Their most recent response: “Economists Want Policy Makers to Back Off Now.” Despite the continuing challenging conditions, 30 out of 48 economists ... said the economy...
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Can the Dead (Capitalism) Be Brought Back to Life? »

I pose this question seriously, not as a physiologist, but as an economic historian. I am provoked to raise the question by an advertisement that Amazon sent me recently, calling my attention a book titled Can Capitalism Survive? Creative Destruction and the Future of the Global Economy. Seeing this sales pitch, my immediate reaction...
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