Archive for April, 2010

Property and Plunder: A Guest Post from Frederic Bastiat »

Property and Plunder Frederic Bastiat (from pp. 6-7 of the FEE edition of The Law): “Man can live and satisfy his wants only by ceaseless labor; by the ceaseless application of his faculties to natural resources. This process is the origin of property. “But it is also true that a man may live and...
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Tax Day Tea Party »

I was invited to speak on entrepreneurship at San Jose’s Tax Day Tea Party event last week, so I thought I would post my remarks. I took a markedly global perspective that focused on free trade and open immigration. The take away is that economic freedom is the key to growth. Of course, a...
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April 19: A Great Day to Distrust Government »

April 19 marks the anniversary of Lexington and Concord (1775), the Warsaw ghetto uprising (1943), and the day the FBI finished off the siege at Waco, Texas, that left nearly 80 civilians dead (1993). It is a good day to think of liberty and the timeless struggle of the state vs. the individual. How...
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Data Don’t Bleed »

I spent several hours today preparing a short article on defense spending for The Beacon, updating similar articles I wrote in 2004 and 2007. The subject matter required me to do a fair amount of work that most people no doubt would consider tedious—locating and cross-checking data, performing various arithmetic operations, checking my figures...
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Defense Spending Is Much Greater than You Think »

When President Obama presented his budget recently for fiscal year 2011, he proposed that the Pentagon’s outlays be increased by about 4.5 percent beyond its estimated outlays in fiscal 2010, to a total of almost $719 billion. Although many Americans regard this enormous sum as excessive, few appreciate that the total amount of all...
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The Inconvenient History of the State »

Here’s an illuminating passage from James C. Scott’s The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia (Yale University Press, 2009): At a time when the state seems pervasive and inescapable, it is easy to forget that for much of history, living within or outside the state — or in...
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Should Teachers Have Tenure? »

That has been a hot topic in Florida this past week, because the Florida legislature passed a bill that would remove job protection from tenure for teachers, prohibit teachers from being paid more for holding advanced degrees, or for being paid more for number of years on the job, and require merit pay based...
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Robert Higgs’s Recent Interview by Libertad Digital (here in English) »

I was interviewed recently by Angel Martin for Libertad Digital, an interesting Spanish website. The interview was posted today. Topics discussed include the recent financial debacle, the current recession, the government’s recent policy actions, and several related, more general subjects, such as “regime uncertainty” and U.S. foreign policy. For those who might be interested...
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Homeschooled Teens: Learn about Today’s Economy! »

The Independent Institute, Economic Thinking, and the Institute for Principle Studies cordially invite homeschooled teenagers and their parents to attend: UNDERSTANDING TODAY’S ECONOMY, 2010 Preview for Homeschoolers from the Challenge of Liberty Summer Seminars Learn what’s going on in today’s economy from excellent educators devoted to free enterprise, limited government, and natural rights. WHEN:...
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Templeton Fellowships Essay Contest Deadline Approaches »

With the May 3 deadline less than one month away, college students and untenured college teachers eligible to enter the 2010 Sir John M. Templeton Fellowships Essay Contest may wish to consult a helpful online resource—the Essay Reference Bibliography. Divided into two sections, this list cites books and articles about the meaning and significance...
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